Yes, I’ll weave a lei for your boat

24 01 2023

On Chinese (Lunar) New Year’s Day, one is not to do any work, but I didn’t mind creating something new for a gentleman who asked if I could make a lei for his boat being launched that day.

I enjoy making fresh lei, and my crew and I have made scores of the garlands for yachts that have finished trans Pacific crossings.

So I gathered the materials from my garden: green ti leaves, alaheʻe (native mock orange), kupukupu fern, and cherry.

They didn’t really need any cleaning. A quick rinse with water and trimming off the stems from the ti was enough.

I made the lei wili style—“wili” means to wind—using 924 (24 gauge) paddle wire from the floral crafts store.

We had agreed on a price for an eight-foot length, but I wanted to use all the material I picked, so the lei became ten feet long.

It was a gorgeous January day, and I was able to meet the customer at 2 pm at the Kaneohe Yacht Club bar. “I’ll be the one with the big lei,” I said.

As you can see, the lei fit perfectly, and the customer gave me a tip. That’s what I mean by “gentleman.”

Welina mai kāua e “Seas the Day”! I hope you catch lots of fish!

Love,

Rebekah





Behold the wreath makers

16 12 2017

For many years now, about ten days before Christmas, I offer a wreath-making workshop for Kaneohe Yacht Club members, their guests, and my guests. Besides having a merry time with ti leaves and tropical flowers from the garden, it is a way for me to train and recruit lei makers for the summers when the Club hosts the arriving yachts in the Pacific Cub yacht race from San Francisco.

More than a dozen people came this morning, and as you can see from the photos, their designs are impressive. They were so tickled with their handiwork and having their pictures taken.

Fashioning fresh green wreaths for Christmas

Representatives of The Fleming Family: Bridget, Joan, and Leslie

Audrey Chang and Noma McLellan

Table decoration

Laurie Kim came with Bonnie Leong

April Nottage and Dana Nottage





Hawaiian garland for the holidays

10 12 2011

In Hawaii we are fortunate to grow gardens with flowers and foliage to decorate our homes and adorn ourselves the year ’round. I’ve started to show others how to craft holiday garlands, such as Christmas wreaths, table centerpieces, hostess gifts, and swags.

Today some of us gathered at the yacht club in Kaneohe to put the decorations together. It’s a fairly easy method adapted from the Hawaiian wili style of lei making. We substituted wire for natural fiber used to whip the plant material together, and we omitted a separate backing that is unnecessary because the stiff stems of ti leaves are sufficient foundation.

This fresh wreath is made of green ti, red ti, laua‘e, and song-of-India leaves. Red and pink ginger blossoms offer pops of complementary colors. A big bow completes my creation.

Just in time for the holidays: handcrafted decorations from our gardens

Copyright 2011 Rebekah Luke




Green and healing

15 07 2011

The Transpac yacht race is nearing the finish line, and I’ll be delivering some boat lei today. But first I have to make them. One is 20 feet long! I gathered the lauae yesterday afternoon from my patch.

Lauae patch

This morning while it’s cool I’m picking the ti leaves. I’ll be putting the lei together all day long. The boats, racing from Los Angeles, finish at Diamond Head buoy and then cruise into Ala Wai Boat Harbor in Waikiki. The first boats have already finished, so I’d better get busy.

Then, tomorrow from 9 to 2 I’m giving Reiki sessions at the Kaneohe Yacht Club Green Market Day while DH, Miss Marvelous’s mom and family will be showing folks how to make a ti leaf lei. We’ll be in the longhouse.

Ti leaves. Easy to grow, and so many uses!

Ti leaves

Copyright 2011 Rebekah Luke







%d bloggers like this: