Hello 2021

2 01 2021

Hello studio fans,

No resolutions, no affirmations. This first post of the new year is more like a personal inventory—a pause to take stock of my likes and what brings me joy, as well as my wishes.

Just looking around, I see I like flowers and fashioning lei. I like to garden and grow food. Cook food, bake fruit pies. Play music, sing. I like to play with my dog; I know he understands English, he’s just not able to speak it. I like to create, as in making art, I like to write and make photos.

I enjoy visiting with our two granddaughters and hope I can be a good example for them.

I enjoy connecting with friends and relatives, remotely at this time. I look forward to a time when I can see them in person. How will we have changed?

And as for my wishes, but no promises, I wish to be kind. a good listener, an understanding mate, lighter all around.

Stringing kou flowers into a lei

Sweet potato stems peeled and prepped for cooking. Tasty!

Mountain apple pie

At the Yamaha

JJ the family dog

My most recent oil sketch with red and green complements

Our moʻopuna

 

Happy New Year!

All the best,

Rebekah





When to open presents

24 12 2020

It’s Christmas Eve at the studio, and there are presents under the tree. DH asked me, when shall we open them? I can tell he’s excited, but we haven’t hung up our stockings yet, and it’s still daylight in the Islands. He asks, maybe one?

Some families attend Christmas Eve midnight service and open gifts after they return home from church.

Some folks wait until Christmas morning, you know, to see what Santa Claus brought. Remember to leave him a treat.

Our granddaughters are allowed to open one each at 5:30 on Christmas morning, and then they have to wait until the rest of the family gets up to open the rest.

When I was a kid, my father would count the presents under the tree addressed to him and open one a day starting that many days before Christmas Day. So, if there were five, he would start opening on December 21. Clever guy, my dad. Who’s the kid, now?

Whenever you open your presents, remember that a gift isn’t a gift until it is received. Receive with gladness and acknowledge the reason for the season.

Wishing everyone a Merry Christmas! Or, as we say in Hawaiian, Mele Kalikimaka! May all your dreams come true.

~ Rebekah 





Odd Christmastime

21 12 2020

Christmastime 2020 seems odd to me. I can’t articulate my feelings well, except to note that Kilauea volcano started to erupt at Halemaumau last night. The video footage I saw was beautiful.

The conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter, the “Christmas star” seen over the manger 2020 years ago, is happening again.

We’re exchanging gifts of home-baked cookies with neighbors and friends, but with face masks on and from a distance because of the pandemic; no hugging.

I am making a pecan pie for my two painting students who are bringing lunch on the 23rd. It’s the final class of Painting I, and coincidentally the studio setup is comprised of the complements red and green Christmas colors.

Chef Logan, who usually delivers our mid-day meal, is taking a break, only to make it up by providing an intimate Dinner for Two for my darling husband and me on Christmas Day. We don’t have to cook!

All this seems odd to me because all I really planned to share was the reindeer Rudolf that my father-in-law—whose father’s name also was Rudolph—made to wish us a Merry Christmas.

“Crater View,” 40” x 30” hand-dyed tissue-paper collage by Rebekah Luke
Holiday cookies

Chef’s creation

Christmas colors

Rudolph

~ Rebekah

 





At home for the long haul

8 06 2020
JJ

Another dog picture, but hey, my dog seems to be the only constant during the current pandemic while we all stay at home. You are staying home, right?

Or at least assigning your trips “off campus” to the same one person per household. For our family that person is Pete.

He took advantage for a brief time of the order-and-pick-up service from Kualoa Ranch just five minutes down the road. Other times he went to Windward Mall in Kaneohe for the weekly farmers market.

The mangoes came from Ewa, the lady said. Yummy, and a good find because our tree isn’t bearing this year.

Coffee cake is topped with fresh mango slices and cinnamon sugar, then baked.
What a beauty!

~ Rebekah





Small road trip

22 05 2020

JJ the dog likes to go for rides

We took time out today for a short road trip down the highway to Kualoa Ranch to pick up the order of groceries we placed on Monday. It was a chance to take the dog for a ride.

To help the community during this period of staying home to guard against the coronavirus, the Ranch initiated this service. Kualoa Ranch, in addition to raising cattle, normally operates varied and numerous recreational and retail activities spread out across its properties for off-island visitors and residents alike. One example is the providing of Kaaawa Valley, that the Ranch owns, for movie locations.

Now it has consolidated its employees to operate a well organized food distribution program for the public.

How it works:

First ask to be put on an email list for Kualoa Grown. The product list is sent out on Monday for Friday pick up. Place your order online. To be added to Kualoa Grown email list please email Terra at tmcginnis@kualoa.com 🤙🏽

On Friday afternoon, drive to the Ranch where you are directed to a pop-up tent to pay. Happy people will place a numbered card on the windshield. Everyone wears protective masks.


Today we picked up orders for two families.

Follow the green traffic cones up the hill to where more happy people will deliver packages straight into your vehicle. Just roll down the window. No need to get out of your car at all.

Today we got apple bananas, beef chili, and fresh string beans. Last week we indulged in a dark chocolate bar, pricey but excellent and worth the money. Sometimes we need to treat ourselves. And go for a ride.

Be well.

Rebekah





Thank the helpers

28 04 2020

This post is a shout out of gratitude to the tireless (and now tired) health care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, such as the nurses and doctors working in the emergency rooms of hospitals throughout the land. My cousin Prince and my friend Lei, who are EMTs at different medical centers in Honolulu, were appreciative of the washable cloth face masks I sent, and although the gear was not regulation, they explained they could wear them over a paper mask while entertaining their co-workers with pretty prints. Too, they could use them if masks became in short supply.

When Lei found out I could sew, she requested surgical caps. On some masks, the elastic that is worn behind the ears becomes uncomfortable to wear after awhile, so I put buttons on the sides for the elastic to hook on to.

Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) that I made includes a face mask from a Marimekko tea towel and a surgical cap from a t-shirt

Lei is the new chair of the Ka Lāhui Hawaii Political Action Committee. I donated my KPAC shirt for the fabric of her one-of-a-kind cap.

Lei, a Kaiser Permanente EMT, dons protective gear including a surgical cap with the words Ka Lahui Hawaii

Thank you, thank you, thank you! You are working so very hard. We are praying for your safety.

~ Rebekah





Coronavirus season check in

8 04 2020

Aloha studio fans and friends,

Self isolation has been the status quo during the COVID19 pandemic. On the wall calendar here in Kaaawa, I wrote DAY 1 on March 11, 2020. I have stayed inside, literally, since then except for a couple of car trips to the nearby post office dropbox and into the garden to rake leaves from the avocado and mango trees. It’s been rather peaceful.

I want to share what I’ve been doing during this odd time to add to the basket of ideas. No doubt you are finding things to do at home as well. I feel that as a community we should help each other if we can. Here goes, in no particular order:

—Early on, I sewed washable face masks for hospital emergency room nurses who I know personally. Those are my cousins in the top photo. I used online instructions from three different websites. Luckily I have a sewing machine and materials. I turned cloth napkins and designer tea towels into cheerful PPEs.

Cloth napkins repurposed into face masks

—I play piano music every day. I saw that in Italy people were opening their windows and sharing their singing. Piano arrangements by Mark Hayes are my current favorites. So why not? I hope my neighbors don’t mind.

Mark Hayes with me and Rev. Danette Kong in the pink lei

—As long as there was flour in the house I baked pizza, bread, and double-crusted dessert pies—apple and banana. And, as we have time, I cooked soup. Any leftovers could be frozen for later, I thought, but there weren’t any leftovers!

Warm, fragrant banana pie with flavors of cinnamon, nutmeg, lime, and butter. Mmmm…

—From stretchy t-shirts with cute messages, I sewed washable surgical caps requested by my nurse pal Lei. After a little experimenting, I drafted my own pattern.

—I cut flowers and brought them inside.

Red ginger, pink ginger, lime puff, lauaʻe fern 

—I sent money to people who ordinarily bank on my payment for income, for example, my vocal coach and the neighborhood diner. The designated grocery shopper for our household did a couple of big shoppings before the market chain announced some of its stores were shutting down. Luckily, our branch remains open so far.

Jazz guitarist and bass player Robert, who is the proprietor of Uncle Bobo’s BBQ restaurant in Kaaawa

—In the beginning I did some discretionary online shopping, but I quickly realized how dangerous that is. I nipped that one in the bud.

—I made voice phone calls to family and friends. In this day of texting and Facebook, we forget that we can dial to hear the voices of our loved ones.

—I limit the time watching television news and my time on Facebook. I prefer the programs on PBS.

—I am trying to declutter stuff. Why do we have so much stuff?

—On my Facebook page I am posting “Fine-art posting #, coronavirus season,“ one each every day, of one of my paintings. I have a lot of inventory!

—If there is one thing I have a good supply of, it is hand soap. For Easter, in lieu of the traditional egg hunt, I plan to put out at the end of our driveway a basket of—wait for it—soap!

Not soap

Thank you for reading. I appreciate you all. Stay safe. Wash your hands. With love,

Rebekah








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