Reprise: Makapuʻu to Waikīkī

16 10 2018

Friends visiting Oʻahu for the first time provide an opportunity for residents to play host as well as tourist. An obligatory activity is a drive around the island. DH and I welcomed the chance last week to go sightseeing, as we had not made the drive ourselves in a long time.

Frank came to visit Pearl Harbor, and Sue Ann was excited to make beautiful photographs. Our first excursion together, however, was around Makapu’u Point—going clockwise if looking at a map—in the direction opposite from the more typical one starting in popular Waikīkī. Our friends are staying on the Windward, or East, side of the island.

So we started in Kāneʻohe, with gorgeous views of the bay, went through Kailua along Kalaheo avenue, into Lanikai and Enchanted Lakes. We exited onto Kalanianaʻole highway that took us through Waimānalo to Makapuʻu beach and lookout. There, we got busy with our cameras.

From here I’ll let my photos below continue this travelog, already posted on Facebook. Thanks for coming along! ~ Rebekah 

Manānā a.k.a. Rabbit Island

Makapuʻu Pt. Lighthouse

Sands of Makapuʻu beach

Improved lookout area at Makapuʻu

The guys—high school classmates in Springfield, Pennsylvania

Naupaka

Coastal plants are low growing

The small yellow-orange flower is ilima

Morning glory

Fishing spot

Pōhuehue

Sandy Beach is its proper name, named for the sand, not a person. 🙂

Sandy Beach, popular with body surfers

Bicycles mean we’re getting closer to Honolulu

The island of Molokaʻi across the channel

Promenade at the old Queen’s Surf site, looking at Waikīkī

The famous Royal Hawaiian Hotel, a pink palace surrounded by highrises

Testing the water of the Pacific Ocean

Canopy of monkey pod trees bordering Honolulu Zoo

Back to the Windward side. “Where I live there are rainbows…”— song lyrics

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke

 





Coming home

14 02 2018

From time to time I like to travel off island from Oahu.

In November we went to New York City, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Baltimore. And last week we went to Austin, TX, for a destination wedding.

Equally exciting is coming home. I always book a window seat on the starboard side of the plane for aerial views of the island.

This time I was rewarded with a beautiful clear day for these fine resolution photos made with my iPhone6s.

Puffy white clouds

The Moku Lua off Lanikai Beach; Mokapu peninsula in the distance

Maunawili

Beautiful Koʻolau Range

HONOLULU!

 





A show that celebrates peace and calm

6 01 2018

The Hoʻomaluhia New Year Invitational 2018 art show opened today with works depicting—you guessed it—Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden! At the base of the Koʻolau Mountains on Oʻahu, the park’s natural beauty is a “can’t miss” subject for any artist.

Go to the visitor center main gallery between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. any day this month through January 26 to view an inspired collection of works, including two of my oil paintings pictured below. Many are for sale. Greg Pai is the juror.

The public is invited to a reception from 4 to 6 p.m. on Sunday, January 14.

Hoʻomaluhia means “let’s make peace and tranquility.” Enter the park at the end of Luluku Road in Kāneʻohe.

Mahalo for taking an interest in art! ~ Rebekah

“Clouds Lifting Over Lanihuli” reveal fresh waterfalls. 20″x 16” oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke

“Rain Fantasy,” 24″ x 18″ oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke





Validation of an artist

4 04 2016

People who make fine art often work alone. Like writers and composers, they start with a blank canvas and require solitude to put their ideas down. Sometimes, when they think they have taken their work as far as it can go and prior to publishing, they work with a team. Working with others helps artists to develop a thick skin because one is surely to receive criticism, constructive or not.

When an artist is brave enough and has the guts to put work on display for others to see—others besides family and close friends—that is a milestone. The next step may be to price the art. Imagine: someone may want to purchase it!

Along the way, colleagues and mentors will help. Mine, Susan Rogers-Aregger, taught me everything I know about finishing paintings so that they are ready for exhibit, how to market art, and how to manage a gallery. I am so very grateful. Yesterday, her tutelage reached another high point with the opening of the group exhibit “Collages and Clay” in Kāneʻohe, Oʻahu.

 

A sparkling collage painting and ceramic masks by Susan Rogers-Aregger greet visitors to new exhibit

A sparkling collage painting and ceramic masks by Susan Rogers-Aregger greet visitors to new exhibit at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden.

 

A dozen artists, all influenced by Susan who also works in clay, combined their hand-dyed tissue paper creations and pots for an exciting display. Friends and family came to celebrate at the reception. No longer alone, we met each others’ human support system and became better acquainted with the lives of the rest of the team.

 

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My sister artists and new friends at the opening reception—Hiroko, Maite, and Dottie. The fat cat in the background is my creation entitled “Living Large.” It has sold!

Bob and Tommy of The Band Tantalus entertained guests with acoustic sounds. Warm to cool palettes grace the gallery walls.

Bob and Tommy of The Band Tantalus entertained guests with acoustic sounds. Warm to cool palettes grace the gallery walls.

 

By the way, artists love sales. A sale for one is a sale for all! Selling our work is how many of us make our income, and it is wonderful encouragement to keep going. Thank you!

Recently I received two emails, sent separately by two individual buyers who photographed my work in their homes and shared the images with me, to show me how they used my paintings in their decor and their artistic eye. That kind gesture took why we make art to another level of appreciation and enjoyment.

If you go— “Collages and Clay” runs through April 29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center, entrance at the end of Luluku Road, Kāneʻohe, Oʻahu.

Copyright 2016 Rebekah Luke




Water lilies in paper

18 03 2016

Aloha studio fans, art patrons and appreciators! I’m taking this, my latest creation, to exhibit at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden for the month of April.

Water Lilies in Paper, 18″ x 24″ hand-dyed tissue paper on canvas, copyright 2016 Rebekah Luke

The opening reception for “Collages and Clay at Hoʻomaluhia” is from 1 to 4 pm, Sunday, April 3. Entertainment by The Band Tantalus. Please come!

This is a newish art medium for me, a departure from landscapes in oil paint after 25 years. I hand-dye the tissue paper with my colleague and teacher Susan Rogers-Aregger at her workshop (it takes a small crew). Folks say they prefer the collages because of their translucence and vibrancy of color. I like the way the technique lends itself to abstract images. What do you think?





Sunny rain

14 03 2015

This is the oil I’m working on now. A tiny diptych. Two times out on location en plein air. Somewhat of a limited palette. I like the looseness of a sketch. It’s not finished. Being careful to not overwork it. Not too likely since my painting hand has limited mobility from overuse. Sunny :-). Rain :-(.

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“Sunny Rain” © 2015 Rebekah Luke

 





Pictures of an exhibition

3 11 2013

Thank you — friends, supporters, studio fans, and patrons — from the bottom of my heart. These are a few images of yesterday’s enjoyable opening day of “Hana Hou: Then & Now” at Ho’omaluhia Botanical Garden.

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Panorama Hana Hou

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