Stringing a lei of kou

21 09 2020

The kou tree in the front garden is blooming and dropping delicate orange-colored blossoms. When strung into a flower lei they look like ilima.

The Hawaiian-English dictionary has this description:

“ 1. n. A tree found on shores from East Africa to Polynesia (Cordia subcordata), with large, ovate leaves, and orange, tubular flowers 2.5 to 5 cm in diameter, borne in short-stemmed clusters. The beautiful wood, soft but lasting, was valuable to the early Hawaiians and was used for cups, dishes, and calabashes. (Neal 714–5.) (PPN tou.)”

I keep the lei cool in the open air between wet newspaper, avoiding the refrigerator, and re-dampen the newspaper as needed.

Beautiful.

After wearing, you may save the lei. As it dries to a rusty orange, snug up the flowers together along the craft ribbon to wear again!

Aloha nō,

Rebekah





Today in the garden

10 09 2020

Red ginger

While in coronavirus lockdown until September 24 (according to latest Hawai’i report), travel without a mask is limited to my garden. It’s not exclusively my garden, as family and neighbors are on the lookout for its fruits and flowers. Here’s this morning’s tour:

Papaya volunteer

 

Ti

 

Avocado in between red hibiscus cuttings

 

Avocado close up

 

Avocado split from its fall from above

 

Ti

 

Panax

 

Kukui nut

 

Donkey tail in a hanging basket

 

Ti

 

Lilikoʻi (passipn fruit)

 

Red ginger

 

Maʻafala breadfruit

 

More Maʻafala breadfruit

 

Pele’s hair — hinahina

 

Maʻafala breadfruit. I’m waiting for more latex sap to ooze out and onto a smooth skin, indicating the breadfruit is ready to harvest.

 

Fallen breadfruit leaf. I’ve used the shape in my art work.

 

Heliconia variety

Be well. Please stay home during coronavirus season—six months and counting!

~Rebekah





Please don’t come to Hawaiʻi; now is not the time

16 08 2020

Renée Morinaka posted this on Facebook for the public.

~ Rebekah





Satisfying a sweet tooth

9 07 2020


Like many of you self isolating at home from the COVID-19 pandemic, for four months now since mid March, our family has returned to home cooking, saving gasoline and money that would have been paid to restaurants. For health reasons I should avoid eating sugar, but I love to bake. So what the heck?
Have a virtual taste of my pie, Dutch baby pancake, scones, and malasadas!

~ Rebekah





At home for the long haul

8 06 2020
JJ

Another dog picture, but hey, my dog seems to be the only constant during the current pandemic while we all stay at home. You are staying home, right?

Or at least assigning your trips “off campus” to the same one person per household. For our family that person is Pete.

He took advantage for a brief time of the order-and-pick-up service from Kualoa Ranch just five minutes down the road. Other times he went to Windward Mall in Kaneohe for the weekly farmers market.

The mangoes came from Ewa, the lady said. Yummy, and a good find because our tree isn’t bearing this year.

Coffee cake is topped with fresh mango slices and cinnamon sugar, then baked.
What a beauty!

~ Rebekah





Small road trip

22 05 2020

JJ the dog likes to go for rides

We took time out today for a short road trip down the highway to Kualoa Ranch to pick up the order of groceries we placed on Monday. It was a chance to take the dog for a ride.

To help the community during this period of staying home to guard against the coronavirus, the Ranch initiated this service. Kualoa Ranch, in addition to raising cattle, normally operates varied and numerous recreational and retail activities spread out across its properties for off-island visitors and residents alike. One example is the providing of Kaaawa Valley, that the Ranch owns, for movie locations.

Now it has consolidated its employees to operate a well organized food distribution program for the public.

How it works:

First ask to be put on an email list for Kualoa Grown. The product list is sent out on Monday for Friday pick up. Place your order online. To be added to Kualoa Grown email list please email Terra at tmcginnis@kualoa.com 🤙🏽

On Friday afternoon, drive to the Ranch where you are directed to a pop-up tent to pay. Happy people will place a numbered card on the windshield. Everyone wears protective masks.


Today we picked up orders for two families.

Follow the green traffic cones up the hill to where more happy people will deliver packages straight into your vehicle. Just roll down the window. No need to get out of your car at all.

Today we got apple bananas, beef chili, and fresh string beans. Last week we indulged in a dark chocolate bar, pricey but excellent and worth the money. Sometimes we need to treat ourselves. And go for a ride.

Be well.

Rebekah





The story of the peacock

20 05 2020

Willy

Aloha mai e studio fans ~

Today I publish for the first time “The Story of the Peacock.” I was given an assignment in my Hawaiian language class to write a story, or mo‘olelo, using action verbs in the past and present tense. I wrote it in English first. When I translate it I must follow a certain sentence pattern and avoid the verbs “to be” and “to have,” so it will not be word for word.

“The Story of the Peacock” isn’t very sophisticated, in my opinion, so I think it will make a good illustrated children’s story. Several years ago I designed bilingual books (Hawaiian/English) for an early education program. This might be a good addition to the library.

The End. Copyright 2020 Rebekah Luke

~ Rebekah








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