Fiery volcano collages & doodles

8 12 2018





The gift of lau hala knowledge

1 12 2018

The gift

For our ʻŌlelo, Hawaiian language, class today Keoua Nelsen, our kumu (teacher, or source), decided his Christmas gift to his haumana (students) would be making lau hala bracelets. Besides teaching Hawaiian, he is a lau hala weaver. Most of us had not woven lau hala before. He introduced us to weaving with an oli, or chant, tracing the origins of the pandanus from its growth to its usefulness.

Kumu provided kits of the materials, having already done the hard part for us—gathering, cleaning, cutting off the thorns, stripping, and softening the lau hala. The kit included 1) a backing that we wound around all five knuckles that our bracelet would have to pass over,  2) a dark-colored warp already stripped into seven quarter-inch widths (see photo) starting about one inch from one end, and 3) a whitish-colored weft.

From top to bottom: backing, warp, weft

The start. The rolled-up backing and the end of the warp are clipped together. The light-colored weft is inserted behind the warp as pictured, and the long end will be folded around and into the inside, to begin the weave from the LEFT.

Chart indicates design steps. You can do the design plan on graph paper.

As it happened, I didn’t follow the design plan exactly. Oops! I unknowingly wove a happy result. It’s called “Nene,” the name of the goose that is the Hawai‘i State bird, because the design resembles the wings!

I repeat my Nene design all around the bracelet. With my fingernail I’ll push the weft strands closer to minimize gaps. Lightly misting with water keeps the work pliable.

Kumu Nelsen shows how to finish the bracelet by hiding and trimming the left-over ends.

Kumu reminds us that learning the Hawaiian language is a gift that you give to yourself. The same can be said of learning how to weave lau hala.

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke





Thanksgiving 2018

22 11 2018

So much to be thankful for. Happy Thanksgiving from all of us at Rebekah’s Studio. Stay cozy!





Holoholo to Volcano

1 11 2018

Kīlauea Caldera with Mauna Loa beyond

A fast overnight trip from Oʻahu to Hawaiʻi island this week reminded me of how easy it is to get away from it all. I accompanied my friend and high school classmate Martha Noyes to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park where she gave an interesting talk on cultural astronomy.

At the Kīlauea Visitor Center we met dedicated park rangers who provided us with maps and the lay of the land before we checked in to our cabin at Kīlauea Military Camp, five minutes away in our rental car.

This was my first time staying at KMC. One can rent very reasonably priced accommodations here, even 3-bedroom cabins, with sponsorship from a military veteran. I thought, hmm, maybe for the next family reunion?

The cabins are rustic yet clean and furnished with enough creature comforts for your stay, including flashlights! A cafeteria, bar/lounge, and bowling alley are nearby.

Row of one-bedroom cabins at Kīlauea Military Camp. Cabin window below.

Exploring is what one would normally do at a national park. Hawai’i Volcanoes is now reopened since the volcano eruption subsided. This year is the 100th anniversary of the Park. But Martha and I preferred to sleep in late and catch up with conversation while drinking coffee.

Nēnē geese, the Hawaiʻi state bird, outside our cabin

ʻŌhia lehua leaves. We wondered if the black stuff was a symptom of rapid ʻōhiʻa death.

Sulfur steam vent

Top: ʻōhiʻa lehua.
Bottom, l to r: laukahi, hinahina moss, orange-colored trunk, uluhe fern.

Panorama view of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from Volcano House. Click for a larger view.

To get there: Turn left when you exit Hilo Airport onto Highway 11 and continue until you reach the park entrance about 28 miles away (40 minutes).

Martha Noyes, author

Martha Noyes’s next talk is scheduled for 6:00 p.m., December 7, 2018, in the Kanaina Building on the Iolani Palace grounds in Honolulu.





Reprise: Makapuʻu to Waikīkī

16 10 2018

Friends visiting Oʻahu for the first time provide an opportunity for residents to play host as well as tourist. An obligatory activity is a drive around the island. DH and I welcomed the chance last week to go sightseeing, as we had not made the drive ourselves in a long time.

Frank came to visit Pearl Harbor, and Sue Ann was excited to make beautiful photographs. Our first excursion together, however, was around Makapu’u Point—going clockwise if looking at a map—in the direction opposite from the more typical one starting in popular Waikīkī. Our friends are staying on the Windward, or East, side of the island.

So we started in Kāneʻohe, with gorgeous views of the bay, went through Kailua along Kalāheo avenue, into Lanikai and Enchanted Lakes. We exited onto Kalanianaʻole highway that took us through Waimānalo to Makapuʻu beach and lookout. There, we got busy with our cameras.

From here I’ll let my photos below continue this travelog, already posted on Facebook. Thanks for coming along! ~ Rebekah 

Mānana a.k.a. Rabbit Island

Sands of Makapuʻu beach

Improved lookout area at Makapuʻu

The guys—high school classmates in Springfield, Pennsylvania

Naupaka

Coastal plants are low growing

The small yellow-orange flower is ilima

Morning glory

Fishing spot

Pōhuehue

Sandy Beach is its proper name, named for the sand, not a person. 🙂

Sandy Beach, popular with body surfers

Bicycles mean we’re getting closer to Honolulu

The island of Molokaʻi across the channel

Promenade at the old Queen’s Surf site, looking at Waikīkī

The famous Royal Hawaiian Hotel, a pink palace surrounded by highrises

Testing the water of the Pacific Ocean

Canopy of monkey pod trees bordering Honolulu Zoo

Back to the Windward side. “Where I live there are rainbows…”— song lyrics

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke

 





Eddie

4 10 2018

We attended our neighbor’s life celebration yesterday at a chapel. Last night, seeing several parked cars next door, we invited ourselves over to the After Party with her widower and the family. I had a really nice conversation with Eddie that was longer than all the words we exchanged over the past 34 years. Very pleasant. Usually our remarks over the panax hedge were cautions about cars and kids on the street, complaints about said hedge, or courteous hellos. Yesterday I got to know Eddie better. I realize that says more about me than anything.





October cactus flower

2 10 2018

Cactus flowers

Are you enjoying our wela (hot) and ikiiki (humid) weather in Hawaii? It seems these plants in my garden do! The cactus that my friend Yo gave me is thriving, and so are the red ti plants put in the garden by Hailama. There are two seasons in our Islands—kau wela (dry season) and hoʻoilo (wet season).

Red ti blossoms

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke








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