Sharing from a friend ~ thank you

12 01 2021




Hello 2021

2 01 2021

Hello studio fans,

No resolutions, no affirmations. This first post of the new year is more like a personal inventory—a pause to take stock of my likes and what brings me joy, as well as my wishes.

Just looking around, I see I like flowers and fashioning lei. I like to garden and grow food. Cook food, bake fruit pies. Play music, sing. I like to play with my dog; I know he understands English, he’s just not able to speak it. I like to create, as in making art, I like to write and make photos.

I enjoy visiting with our two granddaughters and hope I can be a good example for them.

I enjoy connecting with friends and relatives, remotely at this time. I look forward to a time when I can see them in person. How will we have changed?

And as for my wishes, but no promises, I wish to be kind. a good listener, an understanding mate, lighter all around.

Stringing kou flowers into a lei

Sweet potato stems peeled and prepped for cooking. Tasty!

Mountain apple pie

At the Yamaha

JJ the family dog

My most recent oil sketch with red and green complements

Our moʻopuna

 

Happy New Year!

All the best,

Rebekah





Good-bye 2020

27 12 2020

As one last hurrah to close out 2020 and welcome the new year 2021, I present “Painting One Mini Series 2020 A.D.” Two faithful students, Robin and Kristi, came for 10 continuous Wednesdays to my Painting I class in Kaaawa, and I painted the tabletop sets with them. The most recent session was on December 23.

Actually, I would call my work “oil sketches,” as I did them with a palette knife and relatively quickly.

Yellow and black pigment make green

Blue-green and red-orange complements

Yellow/violet color complements

Blue/orange color complements

 

Red/green complements sing for the holidays

 

As the unusual year comes to a close, I’m all ready to toast in 2021 that hopefully can be more harmonious. How about you?

~Rebekah





When to open presents

24 12 2020

It’s Christmas Eve at the studio, and there are presents under the tree. DH asked me, when shall we open them? I can tell he’s excited, but we haven’t hung up our stockings yet, and it’s still daylight in the Islands. He asks, maybe one?

Some families attend Christmas Eve midnight service and open gifts after they return home from church.

Some folks wait until Christmas morning, you know, to see what Santa Claus brought. Remember to leave him a treat.

Our granddaughters are allowed to open one each at 5:30 on Christmas morning, and then they have to wait until the rest of the family gets up to open the rest.

When I was a kid, my father would count the presents under the tree addressed to him and open one a day starting that many days before Christmas Day. So, if there were five, he would start opening on December 21. Clever guy, my dad. Who’s the kid, now?

Whenever you open your presents, remember that a gift isn’t a gift until it is received. Receive with gladness and acknowledge the reason for the season.

Wishing everyone a Merry Christmas! Or, as we say in Hawaiian, Mele Kalikimaka! May all your dreams come true.

~ Rebekah 





Odd Christmastime

21 12 2020

Christmastime 2020 seems odd to me. I can’t articulate my feelings well, except to note that Kilauea volcano started to erupt at Halemaumau last night. The video footage I saw was beautiful.

The conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter, the “Christmas star” seen over the manger 2020 years ago, is happening again.

We’re exchanging gifts of home-baked cookies with neighbors and friends, but with face masks on and from a distance because of the pandemic; no hugging.

I am making a pecan pie for my two painting students who are bringing lunch on the 23rd. It’s the final class of Painting I, and coincidentally the studio setup is comprised of the complements red and green Christmas colors.

Chef Logan, who usually delivers our mid-day meal, is taking a break, only to make it up by providing an intimate Dinner for Two for my darling husband and me on Christmas Day. We don’t have to cook!

All this seems odd to me because all I really planned to share was the reindeer Rudolf that my father-in-law—whose father’s name also was Rudolph—made to wish us a Merry Christmas.

“Crater View,” 40” x 30” hand-dyed tissue-paper collage by Rebekah Luke
Holiday cookies

Chef’s creation

Christmas colors

Rudolph

~ Rebekah

 





Christmas nip in the air

7 12 2020

Staying home because I really don’t want to get sick with the COVID virus, I’ve had to put a moratorium on my online shopping for Christmas gifts. It’s almost too late, but I rationalize that I am not spending money on gasoline for the car or eating out at restaurants.

One room here has been designated “Santa’s Workshop” with gift wrapping and mailing supplies and an area for incoming “no peeking” packages. Quite a few for a big family.

Yesterday our neighbor Eddie presented us with a bag of carambola starfruit—as a kid we called them five fingers. I got up early this morning to process into tangy pickles after a Better Homes and Gardens recipe. I see that I’m out of whole cinnamon sticks, so that means I’ll be sending our designated shopper (DH) out to get some.

Carambola from Eddie

When sliced crosswise, you can see why they are called starfruit

A wonderful gift is one that you make yourself. Merry Christmas! Love,

Rebekah





On obligations

19 11 2020

Besides taking care of your family, what regular activities during this unusual year of 2020 amidst the coronavirus pandemic are you doing that you classify as obligations? I mean obligations in a good way. What commitments do you enjoy? I have four:

The first is the weekly class in fine art painting that I teach in person on my covered deck. Two faithful and lucky adult students gave me the honor to teach The Gloria Foss Color Course for what is probably the last time in my art career.

• Next is my study of Hawaiian language, ʻŌlelo Makuahine (mother tongue), with Kumu Keoua Nelsen who teaches the Kealaleo method for people who have tried to learn Hawaiian many times without success. 😃 Nowadays the three-hour Saturday class is online via Zoom, but it works and we have homework.

• I’m a citizen of Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi and it’s political action committee (KPAC) as “kupuna adviser.” Age has its privileges. We have facilitated community education, such as “how to navigate the legislature,” monitor bills, and write testimony.

• Last but by all means not least is choir practice with the Windward Choral Society directed by Susan McCreary Duprey. It, too, is on Zoom (I’m getting used to the technology, hated it at first), but our director is creative and an “Energizer Bunny.” She makes it work. Among other scores, we are rehearsing George Frideric Handel’s Messiah for a 4 p.m. December 13 performance on (you guessed it) Zoom. I love to sing!

 

Happy and safe holidays, everyone.

~Rebekah








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