Teacher turned student

15 01 2019

    “Lava Flows to the Sea” by Rebekah

Some friends asked me at the beginning of the new year, are you teaching now? Well, the short answer is no. There is nothing scheduled.

At the current exhibit of my large hand-dyed tissue paper collages, another local artist struck up a conversation, admiring the work and explaining that he was unfamiliar with the art medium. He said he would like to learn how to do it, to add to his skills in oil, acrylic, and water color. He was sure he would have to pay some money for lessons. Did I teach it?

I said my teachers were the late Gloria Foss and the late Susan Rogers-Aregger. I was among the next “generation,” but I am not teaching the method, I said. He said I was being selfish. That remark was hard to hear. I’m reflecting on it.

So, if I’m not teaching, what am I doing? I am studying voice, hoping to continue singing as a chorister, and attending Hawaiian language classes. In other words, I am a student.

Having reflected on “selfishness,” I’ll share that there is a scheduled program of tissue dying and collage making by the students of Foss and Rogers-Aregger. Interested persons may come to simply observe or pay fees to participate in the art making. 

The following Tuesdays in 2019 for collage workshop at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center:

January 15, 29

February 12

March 12, 26

April 9, 23

May 14, 28

June 11, 25

July 9, 23

August 13, 27

September 10, 24

October 8, 22

November 12

The following dates in 2019 for tissue dyeing at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center:

February 23 (tie dyeing fabric on February 24)

March 2 and 3

Contact Peggy Hoefer at go_hoefers@hawaii.rr.com for more information.

If you go: “Fiery Volcano Collages and Doodles” by Rebekah Luke and Kalei Nuʻuhiwa runs until Jan. 27, 2019, at the Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center  Lecture Room, daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.





A menu worth repeating

7 01 2019

Oh, the food! Does the food make the party? In the case of last Saturday’s art show opening, yes! Kealoha and Kahikionaokalā Domingo of Nui Kealoha caterers outdid themselves with its farm-to-table menu, supplemented with basic additions of punch and cookies made by me.

Here we share the Nui Kealoha’s menu for the January 5 “Fiery Volcano Collages & Doodles” and the recipes for the cookies and punch, giving credit to their origins. Easy peasy and refreshing.

Kids loved these as well as seedless grape clusters on the side. Take precaution with grapes, a possible choking hazard, for very young children. For the punch, look for a ginger ale without high fructose corn syrups at the store.

Clockwise from lower right: classy menu, poke ʻulu, koʻele pālau tartlets, burnt ʻuala canapé.

 

I found the recipe for chocolate cookies on the back of the Western Family Baking Soda box.

 

Punchbowl recipe by my cousin Elly. From Everyone, Eat Slowly: The Chong Family Food Book (Chong Hee Books, 1999)

Enjoy!
~ Rebekah





Celebrate artists and art today

5 01 2019

Itʻs today! Today is the Opening Reception for “Fiery Volcano Collages & Doodles” at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden at four oʻclock. My co-exhibitor Kalei Nuuhiwa is on Oahu, and we are spending the morning preparing to welcome our friends and supporters who are coming to view and celebrate our latest artworks.Weʻre gathering flowers from the garden to decorate, and we’ve coralled our best buddies to help out with refreshments and musical entertainment.

I am so very honored to show with soon-to-be Dr. Nu‘uhiwa, a PhD candidate at the University of Waikato.

From the show catalog:

THE ARTISTS began creating and assembling the pieces for this exhibit in May 2018 when the longest Kilauea Volcano eruption since 1924 began. News photography and reports and the energy of Pele herself inspired the work. While Rebekah worked with dye, tissue paper, glue, and a knife on large canvases, Kalei used colored pens to doodle in a very small 35-page book. The two women first met on a Kaho‘olawe access trip for Makahiki in the late 1990s, Rebekah coming from O‘ahu, and Kalei from Maui.

The art exhibit runs until January 27. Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden is on Luluku Road in Kaneohe, and it is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Many thanks to the inspirers and the helpers, including the folks at Sunshine Arts in windward O‘ahu for my picture frames, pianist Joerg Alfter, Olive at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden, my girlfriends Becky-Lori-and-Peg, and my “easel” Pete.

~ Rebekah

 





Artist’s process

28 12 2018

When I delivered the final diptych to the framer yesterday for the January 5-27 art exhibit “Fiery Volcano Collages & Doodles” at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Lecture Room, Malinda of Sunshine Arts asked an interesting question: How long did it take you to make the collages? Thinking back, I started them in May when the most recent volcanic activity began and worked non-stop until now. That means I made an average of one diptych (two panels) a month. Most are big. Whew, no wonder I’m tired!

“From Haleakalā”
40” x 30” both panels of diptych. Hand-dyed tissue paper collage. Volcano series by Rebekah Luke

If you go: Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center Lecture Room is located on Luluku Road in Kāneʻohe between Pali and Likelike highways. Open daily from 9 to 4.





I see Santa

25 12 2018

Merry Christmas from all of us at the studio! ~ DH, JJ, and Rebekah





Fiery volcano collages & doodles

8 12 2018





The gift of lau hala knowledge

1 12 2018

The gift

For our ʻŌlelo, Hawaiian language, class today Keoua Nelsen, our kumu (teacher, or source), decided his Christmas gift to his haumana (students) would be making lau hala bracelets. Besides teaching Hawaiian, he is a lau hala weaver. Most of us had not woven lau hala before. He introduced us to weaving with an oli, or chant, tracing the origins of the pandanus from its growth to its usefulness.

Kumu provided kits of the materials, having already done the hard part for us—gathering, cleaning, cutting off the thorns, stripping, and softening the lau hala. The kit included 1) a backing that we wound around all five knuckles that our bracelet would have to pass over,  2) a dark-colored warp already stripped into seven quarter-inch widths (see photo) starting about one inch from one end, and 3) a whitish-colored weft.

From top to bottom: backing, warp, weft

The start. The rolled-up backing and the end of the warp are clipped together. The light-colored weft is inserted behind the warp as pictured, and the long end will be folded around and into the inside, to begin the weave from the LEFT.

Chart indicates design steps. You can do the design plan on graph paper.

As it happened, I didn’t follow the design plan exactly. Oops! I unknowingly wove a happy result. It’s called “Nene,” the name of the goose that is the Hawai‘i State bird, because the design resembles the wings!

I repeat my Nene design all around the bracelet. With my fingernail I’ll push the weft strands closer to minimize gaps. Lightly misting with water keeps the work pliable.

Kumu Nelsen shows how to finish the bracelet by hiding and trimming the left-over ends.

Kumu reminds us that learning the Hawaiian language is a gift that you give to yourself. The same can be said of learning how to weave lau hala.

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke








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