Reprise: Makapuʻu to Waikīkī

16 10 2018

Friends visiting Oʻahu for the first time provide an opportunity for residents to play host as well as tourist. An obligatory activity is a drive around the island. DH and I welcomed the chance last week to go sightseeing, as we had not made the drive ourselves in a long time.

Frank came to visit Pearl Harbor, and Sue Ann was excited to make beautiful photographs. Our first excursion together, however, was around Makapu’u Point—going clockwise if looking at a map—in the direction opposite from the more typical one starting in popular Waikīkī. Our friends are staying on the Windward, or East, side of the island.

So we started in Kāneʻohe, with gorgeous views of the bay, went through Kailua along Kalāheo avenue, into Lanikai and Enchanted Lakes. We exited onto Kalanianaʻole highway that took us through Waimānalo to Makapuʻu beach and lookout. There, we got busy with our cameras.

From here I’ll let my photos below continue this travelog, already posted on Facebook. Thanks for coming along! ~ Rebekah 

Mānana a.k.a. Rabbit Island

Sands of Makapuʻu beach

Improved lookout area at Makapuʻu

The guys—high school classmates in Springfield, Pennsylvania

Naupaka

Coastal plants are low growing

The small yellow-orange flower is ilima

Morning glory

Fishing spot

Pōhuehue

Sandy Beach is its proper name, named for the sand, not a person. 🙂

Sandy Beach, popular with body surfers

Bicycles mean we’re getting closer to Honolulu

The island of Molokaʻi across the channel

Promenade at the old Queen’s Surf site, looking at Waikīkī

The famous Royal Hawaiian Hotel, a pink palace surrounded by highrises

Testing the water of the Pacific Ocean

Canopy of monkey pod trees bordering Honolulu Zoo

Back to the Windward side. “Where I live there are rainbows…”— song lyrics

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke

 





Eddie

4 10 2018

We attended our neighbor’s life celebration yesterday at a chapel. Last night, seeing several parked cars next door, we invited ourselves over to the After Party with her widower and the family. I had a really nice conversation with Eddie that was longer than all the words we exchanged over the past 34 years. Very pleasant. Usually our remarks over the panax hedge were cautions about cars and kids on the street, complaints about said hedge, or courteous hellos. Yesterday I got to know Eddie better. I realize that says more about me than anything.





October cactus flower

2 10 2018

Cactus flowers

Are you enjoying our wela (hot) and ikiiki (humid) weather in Hawaii? It seems these plants in my garden do! The cactus that my friend Yo gave me is thriving, and so are the red ti plants put in the garden by Hailama. There are two seasons in our Islands—kau wela (dry season) and hoʻoilo (wet season).

Red ti blossoms

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke





Taking care of trees

10 09 2018

No time to second guess a hurricane or a tropical storm, here at the studio we’re grateful Rocky and his 6-member crew of Ohana Tree Services were able to trim three large trees today, prior to Hurricane Olivia’s visit to Hawai‘i.

They did a great job, cleaned up all the debris, and hauled it away. We traded cooling shade for better air flow around the property and a lot more daylight. Whether Olivia blows strongly or not, it was time for the trimming. We got a great deal from this professional company with a price that was 37% of the next lowest bid.

Now the kou looks like a lollipop and is without its orange-hued lei flowers for a while. Thankfully the avocado was finished bearing its last three fruit for the season. Hopefully the mango will get the message and give us a crop for next time. As for the Maafala breadfruit, Rocky said to wait until the fruits are ready, and then he will come back to help harvest the tree and trim it at the same time.

Two climbers in the mango

Mango tree after trimming looks like a coat rack

Avocado tree after trimming

Kou tree after trimming has a few leaves remaining

We love our trees.

~ Rebekah

 





Papaya art

21 08 2018

Wowee! I reused the parchment paper on which I dried papaya chunks (using the heat from the oven light only) to bake a puff pastry at 450 degrees F. The paper was still slightly damp from the papaya. Look what happened! I wonder if I can use this paper in my collage art. Gonna try!





Alani

17 08 2018

Peeling an orange on a warm summer day.

Do you remember when you first learned to peel an orange? I do. I was with my Aunty Lois, and we sat down together on the steps of her back porch. When we ate it, juice ran down my arm. Funny, the things I recall.





Mourning a piano

9 08 2018

Never did I think getting rid of an old piano, the thing, would evoke such emotional feelings in me. I put it outside today, to make room for another one, a better one that was newer, shinier, and in tune.

The old piano—I didn’t name it, but it had a name. Story & Clark, and on the back of the sound board was a plaque that said it came from Aloha Piano. I had it for 50 years until today, and it traveled with me from Manoa Valley to Waikiki to Lanikai to Kaaawa.

My father, who had not supported me for several years when I was a minor, ended his silence one day by giving me 800 dollars cash. I used the money to buy the piano. I learned to play on my mother’s parlor grand. I don’t know what happened to it. The three of us went our separate ways.

Ayla’s first piano lessons were on this piano. Now 9, she played the C scale she remembered from a few lessons I gave her and got out her music book just as the piano movers arrived. They took the old piano to the roadside, brought the newer, shinier one to its place in the living room. After the moving truck left, a man came knocking at the door. A stranger.

“Why?” he asked, arms in the air. “Aren’t the keys good?” I explained some were stuck, some strings were broken, all the strings were rusty, and there had been termites in the cabinet. And that the piano tuner could no longer tune it up to concert pitch. Could he ask his friend if she would want it for her kids to plunk on? Sure, I said. She didn’t come.

Anna asks via Facebook if there are any salvageable parts for abstract wall art. Sadly, I am not that ambitious.

All afternoon kids and other passers-by have been plunking on the piano. It will be there for four more days, in the heat and the rain, before it’s taken away. I may still hear it. I’m crying.

Like an old mistress or lover, the memory will take a long time to subside.

©2018 Rebekah Luke

 








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