Today in the garden

10 09 2020

Red ginger

While in coronavirus lockdown until September 24 (according to latest Hawai’i report), travel without a mask is limited to my garden. It’s not exclusively my garden, as family and neighbors are on the lookout for its fruits and flowers. Here’s this morning’s tour:

Papaya volunteer

 

Ti

 

Avocado in between red hibiscus cuttings

 

Avocado close up

 

Avocado split from its fall from above

 

Ti

 

Panax

 

Kukui nut

 

Donkey tail in a hanging basket

 

Ti

 

Lilikoʻi (passipn fruit)

 

Red ginger

 

Maʻafala breadfruit

 

More Maʻafala breadfruit

 

Pele’s hair — hinahina

 

Maʻafala breadfruit. I’m waiting for more latex sap to ooze out and onto a smooth skin, indicating the breadfruit is ready to harvest.

 

Fallen breadfruit leaf. I’ve used the shape in my art work.

 

Heliconia variety

Be well. Please stay home during coronavirus season—six months and counting!

~Rebekah





The story of the peacock

20 05 2020

Willy

Aloha mai e studio fans ~

Today I publish for the first time “The Story of the Peacock.” I was given an assignment in my Hawaiian language class to write a story, or mo‘olelo, using action verbs in the past and present tense. I wrote it in English first. When I translate it I must follow a certain sentence pattern and avoid the verbs “to be” and “to have,” so it will not be word for word.

“The Story of the Peacock” isn’t very sophisticated, in my opinion, so I think it will make a good illustrated children’s story. Several years ago I designed bilingual books (Hawaiian/English) for an early education program. This might be a good addition to the library.

The End. Copyright 2020 Rebekah Luke

~ Rebekah





Happy Mothers Day!

10 05 2020

“Tiare in a Royal Cup,” oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke

Since the 2020 coronavirus season began, approximately, I have published to my Facebook wall one artwork of mine per day. This is fine-art posting #36, “Tiare in a Royal Cup.” Many pieces of this historical China pattern used by The Royal Hawaiian Hotel found their way to thrift shops. One time I saw a sample in a display case along the hotel corridor on the way to the Surf Room. A tiare, or Tahitian gardenia, found its way to my souvenir teacup. This painting is in my own collection. I wish Happy Mothers Day greetings to everyone! ~ Rebekah





A pause to enjoy the fruits of my labor

24 03 2020

Many weeks ago I was interviewed by a Japanese magazine about my art. The editor, local translator, photographer, and I met at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden, a scenic and photogenic spot in windward Oahu.

Impression Gold was planning an issue entitled “Hawai’i the Door to the Art Resort” for American Express card members. For me, it was a unique experience. Usually I am the one writing the stories and making the images.

Today I went to the post office to fetch mail. (Everyone is being careful to avoid the coronavirus.) What a surprise to receive a complimentary copy of the magazine with a two-page spread about me, my hand-dyed tissue paper collages, and my oil paintings. How exciting! I only wish I could read Japanese. Can you?

 

Many thanks to editor Mr. Yoshiaki Nimura and team.

~ Rebekah





Ke aloha nō! Greetings!

22 03 2020

From my garden to brighten our day





From icky to humorous; a Hawaiian language lesson

3 03 2020

In papa ʻŌlelo (Hawaiian language class) we are learning about possessives as well as how to build sentences, being mindful of verb tenses. I offered a descriptive sentence from a real-life experience that kumu Keoua Nelsen had fun with:

There was a dead rat in the glove compartment of my car.

Ahahaha!

Translation: There are some dead rats in our car! How many dead rats are in your car? 7 dead rats! Oh, really?! Best that you swap for a new car!

Don’t worry. We cleaned it out!

~ Rebekah

P.S. The Hawaiian for glove compartment is “ka pahu mikilima,” literally “the mittens box.”





My choral (and) conducting gurus

28 01 2020

Mark Hayes with me and Rev. Danette Kong in the pink lei

This past weekend I attended a three-day choral music workshop by well-known pianist-composer Mark Hayes. Keawalaʻi Congregational Church at Mākena, Maui, founded in 1832, was the venue.

My takeaway, literally, was a folio of sacred and secular music and a series of published articles on how to improvise at the piano. I later found all of the “Improv Notes” on the www.markhayes.com website. One can download them for free.

I am reminded of other times in Honolulu and at Cannon Beach, OR, when I was fortunate as a chorister to sing under the baton of Rodney Eichenberger who is associated with Florida State University. He has coined the motto “what they see is what they get.” I found a Facebook page named “The Rodney Eichenberger Cult.” Indeed, he has a following!

I mined the internet and found “The Life and Philosophy of Choral Conductor Rodney Eichenberger, Including a Detailed Analysis and Application of His Conductor-Singer Gestures” by Adam Jonathan Con. The preview of the book at books.google.com is a fine description.

I’m now inspired to sing in a spring concert with my group, the Windward Choral Society, this February 9, at 4 pm, at St. John Vianney Parish in Kailua, Oahu. We will be singing African-American, spiritual, and gospel numbers. Susan McCreary Duprey directs.

The best part of the weekend on Maui was meeting up with my cousins Rev. Danette Kong, who is the music director at Keawalaʻi Congregational Church, and Steven Lum and Prince Steven who came from Oahu and joined us at this beautiful spot.

Looking toward East Maui from Mākena

Keawalaʻi Congregational Church

L to r: cousins Steven, Prince, Rebekah, and Danette

~ Rebekah








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