Art at Kapalawai Cafe and Deli

1 03 2019


Kalapawai Cafe and Deli, at 750 Kailua Road in Kailua town, Oahu, is exhibiting six of my original paintings currently. They are in the back on the way to the patio and decorating the hallway walls by the restrooms. I like that they are away from the kitchen in a day-lighted area where viewers can linger and not bother customers at tables.


Kapalawai Cafe and Deli is just that—a small, trendy island eatery with a bakery, deli, and drinks. Eat in or take out is your choice.
This is the first time I have hung my work in a restaurant. The feeling early in my career was that people go to restaurants to eat, not to buy art. We’ll see. The daytime manager was a pleasure to work with. Additionally, the prices of the paintings are reduced from the original amounts.

Please consider stopping in this month to feed your tummy and your soul.
Rebekah





Art in the garden extraordinaire

29 01 2019

 

Creator Ira Ono has put together the most charming fine arts gallery in a garden I have ever seen. A friend insisted on taking me there today. Now I agree it’s a must see when you visit Volcano on Hawaii island, where I happened to be for a high school class reunion.

The place is called Volcano Garden Arts and Cafe Ono. I was first attracted to the whimsy of interesting objects d’art mixed within the landscape, such as the colorful tea garden.

A pair of extra large blue-and-white pots stand like sentinels at the beginning of a path

Ono Tea Garden

Nearby, a small clearing ringed with mature pines offers a meditation space with a wooden bench at one edge and an altar at the opposite end.

Other sculpted figures provide additional oriental touches.

Large prayer flags decorate a secluded space for a luncheon or tea.

Mister Rabbit

Bird house spigot

Umbrella-ed tables

Two different lizards

    Miniature succulents

Besides the garden there is an indoor space selling fine art by local artists—2D, jewelry, glass, textiles, an array of gift items. I ran into Ira Ono himself, and we had a delightful conversation that ended with him offering to rep me and my hand-dyed tissue paper collages. The artist has good taste.

~ Rebekah





Celebrate artists and art today

5 01 2019

Itʻs today! Today is the Opening Reception for “Fiery Volcano Collages & Doodles” at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden at four oʻclock. My co-exhibitor Kalei Nuuhiwa is on Oahu, and we are spending the morning preparing to welcome our friends and supporters who are coming to view and celebrate our latest artworks.Weʻre gathering flowers from the garden to decorate, and we’ve coralled our best buddies to help out with refreshments and musical entertainment.

I am so very honored to show with soon-to-be Dr. Nu‘uhiwa, a PhD candidate at the University of Waikato.

From the show catalog:

THE ARTISTS began creating and assembling the pieces for this exhibit in May 2018 when the longest Kilauea Volcano eruption since 1924 began. News photography and reports and the energy of Pele herself inspired the work. While Rebekah worked with dye, tissue paper, glue, and a knife on large canvases, Kalei used colored pens to doodle in a very small 35-page book. The two women first met on a Kaho‘olawe access trip for Makahiki in the late 1990s, Rebekah coming from O‘ahu, and Kalei from Maui.

The art exhibit runs until January 27. Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden is on Luluku Road in Kaneohe, and it is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Many thanks to the inspirers and the helpers, including the folks at Sunshine Arts in windward O‘ahu for my picture frames, pianist Joerg Alfter, Olive at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden, my girlfriends Becky-Lori-and-Peg, and my “easel” Pete.

~ Rebekah

 





Artist’s process

28 12 2018

When I delivered the final diptych to the framer yesterday for the January 5-27 art exhibit “Fiery Volcano Collages & Doodles” at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Lecture Room, Malinda of Sunshine Arts asked an interesting question: How long did it take you to make the collages? Thinking back, I started them in May when the most recent volcanic activity began and worked non-stop until now. That means I made an average of one diptych (two panels) a month. Most are big. Whew, no wonder I’m tired!

“From Haleakalā”
40” x 30” both panels of diptych. Hand-dyed tissue paper collage. Volcano series by Rebekah Luke

If you go: Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center Lecture Room is located on Luluku Road in Kāneʻohe between Pali and Likelike highways. Open daily from 9 to 4.





Fiery volcano collages & doodles

8 12 2018





Holoholo to Volcano

1 11 2018

Kīlauea Caldera with Mauna Loa beyond

A fast overnight trip from Oʻahu to Hawaiʻi island this week reminded me of how easy it is to get away from it all. I accompanied my friend and high school classmate Martha Noyes to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park where she gave an interesting talk on cultural astronomy.

At the Kīlauea Visitor Center we met dedicated park rangers who provided us with maps and the lay of the land before we checked in to our cabin at Kīlauea Military Camp, five minutes away in our rental car.

This was my first time staying at KMC. One can rent very reasonably priced accommodations here, even 3-bedroom cabins, with sponsorship from a military veteran. I thought, hmm, maybe for the next family reunion?

The cabins are rustic yet clean and furnished with enough creature comforts for your stay, including flashlights! A cafeteria, bar/lounge, and bowling alley are nearby.

Row of one-bedroom cabins at Kīlauea Military Camp. Cabin window below.

Exploring is what one would normally do at a national park. Hawai’i Volcanoes is now reopened since the volcano eruption subsided. This year is the 100th anniversary of the Park. But Martha and I preferred to sleep in late and catch up with conversation while drinking coffee.

Nēnē geese, the Hawaiʻi state bird, outside our cabin

ʻŌhia lehua leaves. We wondered if the black stuff was a symptom of rapid ʻōhiʻa death.

Sulfur steam vent

Top: ʻōhiʻa lehua.
Bottom, l to r: laukahi, hinahina moss, orange-colored trunk, uluhe fern.

Panorama view of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater from Volcano House. Click for a larger view.

To get there: Turn left when you exit Hilo Airport onto Highway 11 and continue until you reach the park entrance about 28 miles away (40 minutes).

Martha Noyes, author

Martha Noyes’s next talk is scheduled for 6:00 p.m., December 7, 2018, in the Kanaina Building on the Iolani Palace grounds in Honolulu.





Reprise: Makapuʻu to Waikīkī

16 10 2018

Friends visiting Oʻahu for the first time provide an opportunity for residents to play host as well as tourist. An obligatory activity is a drive around the island. DH and I welcomed the chance last week to go sightseeing, as we had not made the drive ourselves in a long time.

Frank came to visit Pearl Harbor, and Sue Ann was excited to make beautiful photographs. Our first excursion together, however, was around Makapu’u Point—going clockwise if looking at a map—in the direction opposite from the more typical one starting in popular Waikīkī. Our friends are staying on the Windward, or East, side of the island.

So we started in Kāneʻohe, with gorgeous views of the bay, went through Kailua along Kalāheo avenue, into Lanikai and Enchanted Lakes. We exited onto Kalanianaʻole highway that took us through Waimānalo to Makapuʻu beach and lookout. There, we got busy with our cameras.

From here I’ll let my photos below continue this travelog, already posted on Facebook. Thanks for coming along! ~ Rebekah 

Mānana a.k.a. Rabbit Island

Sands of Makapuʻu beach

Improved lookout area at Makapuʻu

The guys—high school classmates in Springfield, Pennsylvania

Naupaka

Coastal plants are low growing

The small yellow-orange flower is ilima

Morning glory

Fishing spot

Pōhuehue

Sandy Beach is its proper name, named for the sand, not a person. 🙂

Sandy Beach, popular with body surfers

Bicycles mean we’re getting closer to Honolulu

The island of Molokaʻi across the channel

Promenade at the old Queen’s Surf site, looking at Waikīkī

The famous Royal Hawaiian Hotel, a pink palace surrounded by highrises

Testing the water of the Pacific Ocean

Canopy of monkey pod trees bordering Honolulu Zoo

Back to the Windward side. “Where I live there are rainbows…”— song lyrics

Copyright 2018 Rebekah Luke

 








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