Impressive impressions

10 02 2022

Gallery ʻIolani on the campus of Windward Community College in Kāneʻohe, Oʻahu, is the spacious venue dedicated to the current Windward Artists Guild exhibit. The entrance to the show space is from the lobby of Palikū Theatre.

“Impressions/Expressions” runs until March 4. I stopped by yesterday with a friend to take a look, and, wow, I am proud to be a member of this art group.

Many thanks to Antoinette Martin, the gallery director who designed the show, and to Lauren Faulkner, the awards juror.

More than 100 artworks from 38 people—both recognized professional artists and newcomers to the art community—are in the fine-art display.

An artists reception for the public is scheduled for 4 to 7 p.m. on Friday, February 11. COVID vaccination protocols will be in effect.

Below are photos of pieces by me and my friends Dorothy Brennan and Bernadette Chan.

“Crater View” hand-dyed tissue-paper collage at right, by me.

Ceramic vases by Bernadette Chan

“The Committee” tissue-paper collage by Dorothy Brennan

 

I hope you will come to see the art show!

~Rebekah





King Kalākaua’s crown

31 01 2022
Kalākaua’s crown

In yesterday’s class taught by historian Ronald Williams about King David Kalākaua of Hawaiʻi, who reigned from 1874-1891, we learned about the coronation. It was an event to assert national independence around the world. The crown, a symbol of nationhood, originally was decorated with 192 small diamonds, 22K gold kalo (taro) leaves, emeralds, rubies, opals, and other gems. Gold-covered pearls from Scotland lead the eye to the top; eight lines of them represented the eight major islands of Hawai’i. I was impressed by the gold kalo leaves.

Gold-covered pearls

When the Hawaiian monarchy was overthrown in 1893, many of the jewels were stolen out of the crown. They have since been replaced. Current visitors to Iolani Palace can see this crown.

~ Rebekah





Prepping for ʻOnipaʻa

16 01 2022

January 17, 2022, marks 129 years since the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy. Following a scheduled Peace March in Honolulu that will end at Queen Liliʻuokalani’s statue, there will be a program of music and speeches throughout the afternoon on the grounds of Iolani Palace.

For Ka Lāhui Hawai’i Kōmike Kalai’āina Chair, Leiānuenue Niheu, “ʻOnipaʻa” is a unified call to the people of the sovereign Hawaiian nation to come together as one force, one will, and one people to resist the settler colonial establishment that governs our islands.”

The Onipa’a Peach March and Gathering annual event helps ensure that the great wrong that was done to Queen Lili’uokalani and the native people of Hawai’i by a small group of American businessmen on January 17, 1893 with the support of US Marines will never be forgotten, she said. 

My good friends, the ones you can always count on for help, came to my  studio today to make very large lei garlands to decorate Keliiponi Hale, the palace pavilion, for the big day. There, kamaʻāina and visitors alike may view a special memorial to native Hawaiian scholar, teacher, and activist Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask who passed over on July 3, 2021.
 
My friends Joe, Girly, Tom, Nancy, Gwen, and I gathered on the back deck to fashion seven lei, each 10 feet long. We had picked the plant material early in the morning—mostly sturdy green ti leaves.
 
Joe went to the pavilion yesterday and photographed it so we could have a better idea of the venue to be decorated.
Clockwise from upper left: Joe, Girly, Gwen, Rebekah, Tom, and Nancy beside the lei garland

Joe

Gwen

Girly

 

Nancy and Tom

I am so very thankful for my friends. As Joe says, an activity like this is better and more fun with a group.

~ Rebekah 

 





On the Windward side

10 08 2021

I took a road trip with the family along the windward side of Oʻahu yesterday to get out of the house during this sad time of the Coronavirus pandemic. (We got a call that a loved one was stuck in Iceland after testing positive. She is not allowed to leave for home in the U.S. and thinks she got the germ prior to departing on the vacation.) The road trip was a welcome respite, and besides, the dog likes to go for rides. I posted my photos of the lovely views on Facebook. You may tap on the link to view them. The link may not work for you if you don’t do Facebook. If that is the case, here’s a sample of what you’re missing.


www.facebook.com/1140036096/posts/10220620267753534/

Kahana Bay

~ Rebekah





Braving the outdoors

30 03 2021
The windward side of the Koʻolau Range as seen from Luluku, the location of Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Gardens. Plant enthusiasts, take note; everything is labeled!

A surprising number of people were in the park at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden this morning where my collage art-making group gathered under the pavilion at parking lot #5 — I think the correct name is Kahua Nui — for a re-orientation, general get-together, and literally some fresh air. We met in part to talk about a “Collage and Clay” group exhibit on tap for June 2021 in downtown Honolulu. The notion of planning a scheduled in-person public event again, after a year-long hiatus because of COVID, is exciting.

L to R: Dottie, Joy, Peg, me (in jeans), Karen (in hat), Flo, Maite, Robyn, and Faye.

Joy brought coffee and sweet nibbles, Dottie brought bananas from her tree, and Peg brought ceramic objet d’art favors for us to take home. Kristi, bless her heart, presented us with small bottles of hand sanitizer for our purses. It was like old home week in the space of less than a couple hours.

Peg’s clay creation has a hole in the bottom, so I think it is calling for a plant.

I didn’t bring anything (tsk, tsk). Some of the gals brought their creations for critique as is customary, but I hadn’t made anything new in hand-dyed tissue paper for the collages in a year, so nothing by me to critique. I did remember to bring a length of white shoji paper for Maitē who needed some to depict breaking waves.

These friends used to get together weekly to make art. Soon, after we’re all fully vaccinated, we may be able to resume that schedule.

It was so nice to see everyone again.

~ Rebekah





Please don’t come to Hawaiʻi; now is not the time

16 08 2020

Renée Morinaka posted this on Facebook for the public.

~ Rebekah





At home for the long haul

8 06 2020
JJ

Another dog picture, but hey, my dog seems to be the only constant during the current pandemic while we all stay at home. You are staying home, right?

Or at least assigning your trips “off campus” to the same one person per household. For our family that person is Pete.

He took advantage for a brief time of the order-and-pick-up service from Kualoa Ranch just five minutes down the road. Other times he went to Windward Mall in Kaneohe for the weekly farmers market.

The mangoes came from Ewa, the lady said. Yummy, and a good find because our tree isn’t bearing this year.

Coffee cake is topped with fresh mango slices and cinnamon sugar, then baked.
What a beauty!

~ Rebekah








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