Stuck in nowhere land

11 06 2019

Airports aren’t really anywhere, and neither are airplanes. I am on a journey from Honolulu to New York City, and at the moment I am on the second floor at an airport magazine kiosk and just picked out the dried mango and almonds from a package of trail mix for breakfast, downing the morsels with a cranberry drink.

I’ve just realized I will be in nowhere land at the San Jose, California, airport for about 12 hours. I arrived at this town last night and was told the temperature reached 108 degrees. This morning I had the bright idea of leaving the Motel 6 (by the way, a clean and adequate overnight accommodation for a single traveler) while it was cooler, for the airport. I envisioned hanging out at an air conditioned frequent flyer lounge, sit-down restaurants, and expensive gift shops.

San Jose Airport, it turns out, at least in the terminal I’m in, has only one lounge, and it is at gate such-and-such, but no matter. I cannot get to any gate without going through TSA security, and to do that one needs a boarding pass that I won’t have until 7 p.m. when I meet up with my group—a high school choir for which I have signed on as a chaperone. Had I been thinking, I would have cancelled the airport taxi and gone to the Denny’s across the motel parking lot for a better meal.

But, a silver lining! I see a grand piano yonder, between the elevator and the escalator. I think I’ll saunter over to play some tunes. Yes, yes, someone left a music collection of Chopin waltzes. I am never lonely when I play piano.

Tomorrow morning our group will land in The Big Apple, and the real adventure will begin.

~ Rebekah

 





Mothers Day 2019–I kept my commitment

12 05 2019

 

When the pool is filled and the fountain spurts high, Thomas Square is even more of an oasis in mid-Honolulu.

Mothers Day 2019. I kept my commitment to serve the homeless and needy in Honolulu today. The venue was Thomas Square (photos below).

My friend’s hobby is to cook and serve a delicious buffet meal to the homeless on a fairly regular basis for free. Today she added a free store. The recipe ingredients and pre-owned store inventory are largely donated. She has a handful of helpers who pack, drive, unload, unpack, set up tents and tables, serve, and break down from about 9 in the morning to 4 in the afternoon. It’s rough work. The venue might change from time to time, but her regulars find her by word-of mouth. 

In the morning Thomas Square is neat and tidy; public restrooms are clean, thanks to a dedicated City & County crew. However, the park that is one square city block and planted with mature banyan trees around a circular fountain gets a little trashed during the day, I noticed, and it looks like it’s a growing hangout for folks looking for a place to sleep at night. Before, it was refreshing to see the pool with water in it and the fountain operating. Today it was dry.

“Customers” waited patiently for the food and store to be set up and then were grateful, mostly, to fill their bowls and plates. Some looked disheveled. Some were very tired. Hot soup, several kinds of salads, a meat-and-rice dish, Greek dolmas, macaroni and cheese (Gouda with bacon!), yogurt, corn dogs, chips, cold tea and water—are you hungry yet?

For me, it was a rough day in terms of interacting with this particular public. It is not in my repertoire. I returned home to read that the homeless people in Chinatown made the front page of the daily newspaper again.

It’s too bad. I think I can do this only about once a year. God’s blessings to my friend and her regular team.

Thomas Square’s refreshing-looking lawn

Mature banyan trees

Shady spot

Old sign

Fascinating aerial roots

Thomas Square, with dry pool and fountain in the foreground





Eggs

18 04 2019


Our neighborhood is having a nighttime egg hunt on Good Friday, so Maundy Thursday’s secular activity was dyeing eggs—real hard-cooked chicken eggs.

I recall the children being so excited to find “a real egg” last year. It’s been the fashion to hide plastic candy-filled eggs. Sheesh.

Ayla got right into the decorating while we noticed how competitive her Papa was in his designs.


We dye Easter eggs every year,  delighted to pass the tradition on to the next generations.

After the eggs dried, I buffed them with a little salad oil and a soft cloth for shine.

The kids are advised to bring flashlights, but they won’t need them at our place. Motion sensor lights will make the night bright as day.

Happy Easter!

~ Rebekah





Spring equinox 2019 update

20 03 2019

Greetings, studio fans ~

What’s happening? For me, Spring is better than welcoming a new calendar year. I like to survey the garden around the house as well as the garden in my mind. It’s a time for trimming, plucking, and weeding out the old; and for planting new, more desirable seeds.

This morning I tended the basil, pinching off the flowers from most of the sweet herb because I want to use it instead of letting it go to seed. I left some of the flowers on the plant for the bees. Everyday I check the side yard to see if any of the avocados from my neighbor’s tree have fallen, and to pick up and toss old breadfruit leaves from the ground. I strip off the bottom layer of all the ti leaf plants that I’ve cultivated mostly to make lei. The kou tree, planted for its shade and orange lei flowers, makes a lot of rubbish with its palm-size leaves and ball-bearing-like seeds, so there’s raking to do. Looking up, I see the avocado tree is finally flowering!

Actual Ma‘afala breadfruit tree

Then, I’m revisiting the studio’s purpose “Old-fashioned letters, painting & healing.”

Letters. I’m honored to be invited to coach the Ko‘olauloa Hawaiian Civic Club members tomorrow night in writing autobiography. I intend it to be a fun activity as we write individual anecdotes and craft pretty booklets. I have chosen as jumping off points these questions: “What was your best birthday?”  “Who is your strangest family member?” “What is your greatest fear about falling in love?” “What is the craziest thing you have ever done?” And then for the brave, “How?” and “Why?”

Painting. My collage group (painting with hand-dyed paper) is exhibiting its artworks the month of April starting April 3 in the main gallery at the visitor center of Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden, on Luluku Road in Kaneohe, Oahu. I’ve agreed to design the look of the “Collages & Clay” that also includes ceramics. I’ll draw on the memory of observing how Susan Rogers-Aregger and Noreen Naughton placed pieces for a show.

Hand-dyed paper collage of breadfruit leaves by Rebekah Luke

Healing. It has been exciting to teach, attune, and certify five new Reiki Masters and Reiki Master Teachers. The Reiki Intensive training spands eight days, with the current program ending next Sunday with “Journey into Mastery.” I am team teaching with Reiki Master Teacher Lori A. Wong. I am reminded that “Yes! I am a Reiki Master!”

 

Aloha,

Rebekah

 





Announcement: Sign up for the Unlimited Reiki System of Natural Healing

11 02 2019
Reiki Master Teachers Rebekah Luke and Lori A. Wong are set to offer Reiki Intensive classes on March 17 and March 24, 2019, both Sundays during Spring Break, at Rebekah’s healing space in Kaaawa, Oahu. Both women are certified independent Reiki masters from Dr. Mikao Usui through Mrs. Hawayo Takata.

You are invited to learn the “Unlimited Reiki System of Natural Healing” to help heal, harmonize, and balance the mind, body, spirit, and emotions. Reiki is the universal life force energy found in all living things. Please share this notice with your friends who may be interested in the training, too, and we can have a larger class.

Classes are as follows:

     REIKI LEVEL I (Healing on the Physical Body Level, Yourself & Others)—March 17, 2019, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
     REIKI LEVEL II (Healing on the Mental and Emotional Levels, Distance Healing) and REIKI LEVEL III (Master Certification; Teacher Certification)—March 24, 2019, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
     Both classes will be held at 51-151 Kaaawa Park Lane, Kaaawa, HI 96730.
Tuition of $150 for each class is payable in advance, and it includes training, materials, initiation, attunements, and certification. Lunch and healthy snacks will be served.
To register, please phone or text Rebekah at 808 220-9642 or reply to rebekahluke@hawaii.rr.com by the end of February 2019. Send a deposit check of $50 to be applied to your tuition by February 28 to Rebekah Luke, P.O. Box 574, Kaaawa HI 96730. VISA and MasterCard are accepted. When you have registered, you will receive a confirmation by email.
In gratitude,
Lori A. Wong and Rebekah Luke

 





Celebrate artists and art today

5 01 2019

Itʻs today! Today is the Opening Reception for “Fiery Volcano Collages & Doodles” at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden at four oʻclock. My co-exhibitor Kalei Nuuhiwa is on Oahu, and we are spending the morning preparing to welcome our friends and supporters who are coming to view and celebrate our latest artworks.Weʻre gathering flowers from the garden to decorate, and we’ve coralled our best buddies to help out with refreshments and musical entertainment.

I am so very honored to show with soon-to-be Dr. Nu‘uhiwa, a PhD candidate at the University of Waikato.

From the show catalog:

THE ARTISTS began creating and assembling the pieces for this exhibit in May 2018 when the longest Kilauea Volcano eruption since 1924 began. News photography and reports and the energy of Pele herself inspired the work. While Rebekah worked with dye, tissue paper, glue, and a knife on large canvases, Kalei used colored pens to doodle in a very small 35-page book. The two women first met on a Kaho‘olawe access trip for Makahiki in the late 1990s, Rebekah coming from O‘ahu, and Kalei from Maui.

The art exhibit runs until January 27. Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden is on Luluku Road in Kaneohe, and it is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Many thanks to the inspirers and the helpers, including the folks at Sunshine Arts in windward O‘ahu for my picture frames, pianist Joerg Alfter, Olive at Ho‘omaluhia Botanical Garden, my girlfriends Becky-Lori-and-Peg, and my “easel” Pete.

~ Rebekah

 





Artist’s process

28 12 2018

When I delivered the final diptych to the framer yesterday for the January 5-27 art exhibit “Fiery Volcano Collages & Doodles” at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Lecture Room, Malinda of Sunshine Arts asked an interesting question: How long did it take you to make the collages? Thinking back, I started them in May when the most recent volcanic activity began and worked non-stop until now. That means I made an average of one diptych (two panels) a month. Most are big. Whew, no wonder I’m tired!

“From Haleakalā”
40” x 30” both panels of diptych. Hand-dyed tissue paper collage. Volcano series by Rebekah Luke

If you go: Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden Visitor Center Lecture Room is located on Luluku Road in Kāneʻohe between Pali and Likelike highways. Open daily from 9 to 4.








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