At home for the long haul

8 06 2020
JJ

Another dog picture, but hey, my dog seems to be the only constant during the current pandemic while we all stay at home. You are staying home, right?

Or at least assigning your trips “off campus” to the same one person per household. For our family that person is Pete.

He took advantage for a brief time of the order-and-pick-up service from Kualoa Ranch just five minutes down the road. Other times he went to Windward Mall in Kaneohe for the weekly farmers market.

The mangoes came from Ewa, the lady said. Yummy, and a good find because our tree isn’t bearing this year.

Coffee cake is topped with fresh mango slices and cinnamon sugar, then baked.
What a beauty!

~ Rebekah





Small road trip

22 05 2020

JJ the dog likes to go for rides

We took time out today for a short road trip down the highway to Kualoa Ranch to pick up the order of groceries we placed on Monday. It was a chance to take the dog for a ride.

To help the community during this period of staying home to guard against the coronavirus, the Ranch initiated this service. Kualoa Ranch, in addition to raising cattle, normally operates varied and numerous recreational and retail activities spread out across its properties for off-island visitors and residents alike. One example is the providing of Kaaawa Valley, that the Ranch owns, for movie locations.

Now it has consolidated its employees to operate a well organized food distribution program for the public.

How it works:

First ask to be put on an email list for Kualoa Grown. The product list is sent out on Monday for Friday pick up. Place your order online. To be added to Kualoa Grown email list please email Terra at tmcginnis@kualoa.com 🤙🏽

On Friday afternoon, drive to the Ranch where you are directed to a pop-up tent to pay. Happy people will place a numbered card on the windshield. Everyone wears protective masks.


Today we picked up orders for two families.

Follow the green traffic cones up the hill to where more happy people will deliver packages straight into your vehicle. Just roll down the window. No need to get out of your car at all.

Today we got apple bananas, beef chili, and fresh string beans. Last week we indulged in a dark chocolate bar, pricey but excellent and worth the money. Sometimes we need to treat ourselves. And go for a ride.

Be well.

Rebekah





The story of the peacock

20 05 2020

Willy

Aloha mai e studio fans ~

Today I publish for the first time “The Story of the Peacock.” I was given an assignment in my Hawaiian language class to write a story, or mo‘olelo, using action verbs in the past and present tense. I wrote it in English first. When I translate it I must follow a certain sentence pattern and avoid the verbs “to be” and “to have,” so it will not be word for word.

“The Story of the Peacock” isn’t very sophisticated, in my opinion, so I think it will make a good illustrated children’s story. Several years ago I designed bilingual books (Hawaiian/English) for an early education program. This might be a good addition to the library.

The End. Copyright 2020 Rebekah Luke

~ Rebekah





Happy Mothers Day!

10 05 2020

“Tiare in a Royal Cup,” oil on canvas by Rebekah Luke

Since the 2020 coronavirus season began, approximately, I have published to my Facebook wall one artwork of mine per day. This is fine-art posting #36, “Tiare in a Royal Cup.” Many pieces of this historical China pattern used by The Royal Hawaiian Hotel found their way to thrift shops. One time I saw a sample in a display case along the hotel corridor on the way to the Surf Room. A tiare, or Tahitian gardenia, found its way to my souvenir teacup. This painting is in my own collection. I wish Happy Mothers Day greetings to everyone! ~ Rebekah





Coronavirus season check in

8 04 2020

Aloha studio fans and friends,

Self isolation has been the status quo during the COVID19 pandemic. On the wall calendar here in Kaaawa, I wrote DAY 1 on March 11, 2020. I have stayed inside, literally, since then except for a couple of car trips to the nearby post office dropbox and into the garden to rake leaves from the avocado and mango trees. It’s been rather peaceful.

I want to share what I’ve been doing during this odd time to add to the basket of ideas. No doubt you are finding things to do at home as well. I feel that as a community we should help each other if we can. Here goes, in no particular order:

—Early on, I sewed washable face masks for hospital emergency room nurses who I know personally. Those are my cousins in the top photo. I used online instructions from three different websites. Luckily I have a sewing machine and materials. I turned cloth napkins and designer tea towels into cheerful PPEs.

Cloth napkins repurposed into face masks

—I play piano music every day. I saw that in Italy people were opening their windows and sharing their singing. Piano arrangements by Mark Hayes are my current favorites. So why not? I hope my neighbors don’t mind.

Mark Hayes with me and Rev. Danette Kong in the pink lei

—As long as there was flour in the house I baked pizza, bread, and double-crusted dessert pies—apple and banana. And, as we have time, I cooked soup. Any leftovers could be frozen for later, I thought, but there weren’t any leftovers!

Warm, fragrant banana pie with flavors of cinnamon, nutmeg, lime, and butter. Mmmm…

—From stretchy t-shirts with cute messages, I sewed washable surgical caps requested by my nurse pal Lei. After a little experimenting, I drafted my own pattern.

—I cut flowers and brought them inside.

Red ginger, pink ginger, lime puff, lauaʻe fern 

—I sent money to people who ordinarily bank on my payment for income, for example, my vocal coach and the neighborhood diner. The designated grocery shopper for our household did a couple of big shoppings before the market chain announced some of its stores were shutting down. Luckily, our branch remains open so far.

Jazz guitarist and bass player Robert, who is the proprietor of Uncle Bobo’s BBQ restaurant in Kaaawa

—In the beginning I did some discretionary online shopping, but I quickly realized how dangerous that is. I nipped that one in the bud.

—I made voice phone calls to family and friends. In this day of texting and Facebook, we forget that we can dial to hear the voices of our loved ones.

—I limit the time watching television news and my time on Facebook. I prefer the programs on PBS.

—I am trying to declutter stuff. Why do we have so much stuff?

—On my Facebook page I am posting “Fine-art posting #, coronavirus season,“ one each every day, of one of my paintings. I have a lot of inventory!

—If there is one thing I have a good supply of, it is hand soap. For Easter, in lieu of the traditional egg hunt, I plan to put out at the end of our driveway a basket of—wait for it—soap!

Not soap

Thank you for reading. I appreciate you all. Stay safe. Wash your hands. With love,

Rebekah





A pause to enjoy the fruits of my labor

24 03 2020

Many weeks ago I was interviewed by a Japanese magazine about my art. The editor, local translator, photographer, and I met at Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden, a scenic and photogenic spot in windward Oahu.

Impression Gold was planning an issue entitled “Hawai’i the Door to the Art Resort” for American Express card members. For me, it was a unique experience. Usually I am the one writing the stories and making the images.

Today I went to the post office to fetch mail. (Everyone is being careful to avoid the coronavirus.) What a surprise to receive a complimentary copy of the magazine with a two-page spread about me, my hand-dyed tissue paper collages, and my oil paintings. How exciting! I only wish I could read Japanese. Can you?

 

Many thanks to editor Mr. Yoshiaki Nimura and team.

~ Rebekah





I’m still here

16 03 2020

Aloha to everyone. I’m still here at the studio in Kaaawa, isolating myself from the current COVID19 corona virus pandemic. As I fall into the elderly age category, I thought early on that it would be best to stay inside.

I canceled all my appointments right away, and I sent money to the services I normally patronize to ease their stress of losing income. I bought gift certificates from restaurants.So far, so good, and I am not sick. I wrote to my friends in Italy, and they replied they are well but vigilant.

DH went out for groceries and reported all was calm at the market. I wiped down each item with vinegar solution before putting it away.

I watch TV and check Facebook, keeping in mind that I can think for myself. As always, one has to discern fact from fiction and opinion.

I came across an article that I share below, via my friend Naomi’s feed—giving credit to the original author.

Naomi, who lives in Germany, wrote: Saw this and had to steal it!

“Lockdown
Yes there is fear.
Yes there is isolation.
Yes there is panic buying.
Yes there is sickness.
Yes there is even death.
But,
They say that in Wuhan after so many years of noise
You can hear the birds again.
They say that after just a few weeks of quiet
The sky is no longer thick with fumes
But blue and grey and clear.
They say that in the streets of Assisi
People are singing to each other
across the empty squares,
keeping their windows open
so that those who are alone
may hear the sounds of family around them.
They say that a hotel in the West of Ireland
Is offering free meals and delivery to the housebound.
Today a young woman I know
is busy spreading fliers with her number
through the neighbourhood
So that the elders may have someone to call on.
Today Churches, Synagogues, Mosques and Temples
are preparing to welcome
and shelter the homeless, the sick, the weary
All over the world people are slowing down and reflecting
All over the world people are looking at their neighbours in a new way
All over the world people are waking up to a new reality
To how big we really are.
To how little control we really have.
To what really matters.
To Love.
So we pray and we remember that
Yes there is fear.
But there does not have to be hate.
Yes there is isolation.
But there does not have to be loneliness.
Yes there is panic buying.
But there does not have to be meanness.
Yes there is sickness.
But there does not have to be disease of the soul
Yes there is even death.
But there can always be a rebirth of love.
Wake to the choices you make as to how to live now.
Today, breathe.
Listen, behind the factory noises of your panic
The birds are singing again
The sky is clearing,
Spring is coming,
And we are always encompassed by Love.
Open the windows of your soul
And though you may not be able
to touch across the empty square,
Sing.”
Brother Richard Hendrick (Ireland)
March 13th 2020

Friends, please keep the faith, be well, sing, and know that you are loved.

~ Rebekah








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